eventgrafik-2014



Helmut Lachenmann – GOT LOST

Public Workshop

 

Helmut Lachenmann, who can be seen – like Brian Ferneyhough – as one of the most important protagonists in the history of the Summer Course will be coming to Darmstadt in 2014 for a few days as "Visiting Composer" and will attend several workshops on his music. The first of these deals with Lachemann's "song cycle" GOT LOST, premiered in Munich in 2008, with the soprano Yuko Kakuta and the pianist Yukiko Sugawara. The focus of this session will be Lachenmann's complex treatment of the voice in this work and in others. Referring to GOT LOST, the composer noted: "Three only seemingly incompatible texts, stripped of their pathos-laden, poetic and profane diction, are sent from the same sound source – a soprano voice singing "in whatever way" – into a constantly changing field of sound, reverberation and movement. Calling out, playfully, "warbling" and lamenting arioso: they interrupt and pervade one another, thus marking out a space that ultimately remains foreign to them, and in which – as in all my compositions – music reflects upon itself with "expression"-less joviality, thus showing its awareness of the transcendent, god-less message of "ridicolas" that unifies these three texts."


Helmut Lachenmann 2006 in Darmstadt, Photo: Günther Jockel

Tutor

Helmut Lachenmann

Public Workshop

 

Helmut Lachenmann, who can be seen – like Brian Ferneyhough – as one of the most important protagonists in the history of the Summer Course will be coming to Darmstadt in 2014 for a few days as "Visiting Composer" and will attend several workshops on his music. The first of these deals with Lachemann's "song cycle" GOT LOST, premiered in Munich in 2008, with the soprano Yuko Kakuta and the pianist Yukiko Sugawara. The focus of this session will be Lachenmann's complex treatment of the voice in this work and in others. Referring to GOT LOST, the composer noted: "Three only seemingly incompatible texts, stripped of their pathos-laden, poetic and profane diction, are sent from the same sound source – a soprano voice singing "in whatever way" – into a constantly changing field of sound, reverberation and movement. Calling out, playfully, "warbling" and lamenting arioso: they interrupt and pervade one another, thus marking out a space that ultimately remains foreign to them, and in which – as in all my compositions – music reflects upon itself with "expression"-less joviality, thus showing its awareness of the transcendent, god-less message of "ridicolas" that unifies these three texts."

Helmut Lachenmann 2006 in Darmstadt, Photo: Günther Jockel